Sorry, not everyone will get a second stimulus payment. What we know so far

Sorry, not everyone will get a second stimulus payment. What we know so far

If you fall into one of these categories, you may not qualify to receive a new check, depending on how the final bill is put together.

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With negotiations on pause for a new COVID-19 relief bill, it’s hard to say who will qualify for a second stimulus check. The Senate returned to work on Monday, but President Donald Trump is currently silent on the matter. However, President-elect Joe Biden has a coronavirus stimulus plan that includes another check.

However, while we don’t know when another payment could arrive or exactly how much money you’d personally get, we do know who made the cut for the first stimulus check and how some key requirements might change. 

Single taxpayers whose AGI is over $99,000

Your adjusted gross income is the sum of money you earn in one year, minus approved deductions. The IRS uses your AGI to determine if you qualify for all, some or none of the $1,200 stimulus check. Under the CARES Act, your AGI cutoff as a single taxpayer is $99,000 per year to qualify for a stimulus payment. If you earned more than that through a paycheck or other assets, like stocks, the IRS wouldn’t send you a check.

Heads of household with an AGI over $146,500

Similar to the single-taxpayer cutoff, heads of households (people who don’t file jointly and who claim a dependent) with an AGI over $146,500 were also excluded from the CARES Act — unless you qualified with this loophole. To get some of the stimulus money, you would need to make less than $146,500. To get the full amount, your AGI would need to be less than $112,500 as the head of household.

Married couples who make over $198,000 a year

If you’re a married couple filing jointly and have an AGI above $198,000, you likely won’t be eligible for a second stimulus payment, unless your children create a situation that appears to be an exception. To get the full payment of $2,400, your joint AGI would need to be less than $150,000. The amount you could receive will decrease if your AGI is between $150,000 and $198,000.

Uncertain: Teenagers over age 16 and college students under age 24

When the first round of stimulus checks was sent, millions of young Americans were excluded from receiving the payment — with these exceptions. Those who were between the ages of 17 and 24, who were also claimed as child dependents, didn’t get a check of their own due to the tax code definition of a child. So if you’re 17 or older, you’re not considered a child under the CARES Act, even if you still live at home.

Uncertain: People who defined as ‘nonresident aliens’

If you’re a nonresident alien, you may not be eligible for a second stimulus check. The government defines a nonresident alien as someone who “has not passed the green card test or the substantial presence test.” 

People whose spouses are considered nonresident aliens

If you’re married to someone who is considered a nonresident alien, you weren’t able to receive the first stimulus check for yourselves or money for your dependents if you file your taxes jointly — even if the qualifying parent and child are citizens of the US. 

People who owe child support payments (but this could change)

With the first stimulus check, if you were behind on child support payments by as much as $150, the government gave the states the right to garnish what you owed. For example, if you owed $2,000, your entire stimulus check went to your child’s other parent. If you owed $500, that amount was taken out of your stimulus check.

Now under legal review: People who are incarcerated

Originally, people who were incarcerated were deemed by the IRS to be eligible to receive a stimulus check, and then they were interpreted as ineligible. But a ruling from a federal judge in California allows inmates to file for the first stimulus payment online by Nov. 21, noting that the CARES Act didn’t explicitly ban this group. 

People who have died since the last tax filing

The IRS “sent almost 1.1 million payments totaling nearly $1.4 billion to deceased individuals,” according to the US Government Accountability Office, before asking for the money back (return process here).

If someone has died since the previous tax filing, the current IRS guidance is that they’re currently not eligible to receive a check and their families can’t keep the money on their behalf — for example, if the deceased filed taxes jointly with a spouse. If by accident a check is addressed to them, the IRS expects the family to return the payment, though they may not be legally required to do so.

Source: Cnet


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